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Promote the Vote

On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was officially ratified, giving women the right to vote in all elections. Now, a century later, women’s right to vote and advocate for positive change remains a reason to celebrate!

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland is celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage with a week dedicated to honoring the history of women's right to vote. 


Promote the Vote Patch Program

Patch Program Overview

On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was officially ratified, giving women the right to vote in all elections. Now, a century later, women’s right to vote and advocate for positive change remains a reason to celebrate!

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland is celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage and we are challenging our members—girls and adults—to join in! With the Promote the Vote Patch Program, you’ll explore why voting matters, find out about voting in your own community, and take an action to persuade others to support a cause that is important to you. 

Girl Scouts & Civic Education

Girl Scouts was founded in the final years of the suffrage campaigns, and many women supported both movements. For example, Edith Carpenter Macy and Mamie Williams (among many others) were both suffragists.

Girl Scouts’ emphasis on the importance of civics education and of understanding democracy and government began in 1918 with the first Civics badge, followed by a Citizens badge in 1920. This continues to be a priority today.

Although the 19th Amendment was a significant step for women’s rights in our country, many women were still discriminated against and denied equal rights. To learn more about suffragists and their fight for the right to vote, download the complete Suffrage Centennial Toolkit.

Earn Your Patch

These guidelines are also found on our Promote the Vote Patch Program flyer! To earn your patch, complete 3 of the options under “Discover,” 2 of the options under “Connect,” and 1 of the options under “Take Action.” And when you’re finished, complete the Promote the Vote Report Form to receive your very own Promote the Vote patch! And wear it proudly. 

Discover: Learn about voting, suffrage, and elections.
Complete three activities or discussions from the following list.

  • Have you ever been to a voting booth? Find out what voters do in a voting booth.
  • What does it mean to vote? Is it important? Why or why not?
  • Does voting make you a good neighbor?
  • Ask a female adult about their first time voting. Whom did they vote for and why?
  • Learn about the local and national campaigns for women’s suffrage.
  • Why were some people were opposed to women voting?
  • Learn the definition of civil disobedience and research examples.
  • Learn who represents you in the United States Congress and how to contact them to express your opinion on an issue important to you.
  • Learn about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. How do they connect to suffrage?

Connect: Learn to your community.
Complete two activities or discussions from the following list.

  • Do the adults you know vote? Ask them why or why not?
  • Educate yourself on the importance of voting and civic engagement.
  • Find out where a voting location is in your community.
  • Learn about your elected officials in your community. Who are your local officials—mayor school board member, city council member? Who are your state officials—governor, state senator, and state representative? Who are your national officials—United States president, senator, and representative?

Take Action: Share your knowledge and promote the vote!
Complete one activity from the following list.

  • Think about what is important to your town or community and create a one-minute talk and a poster to teach others about why it is important to vote on your issue. Your issue might be recycling, literacy/reading, protecting animals, the environment, or homelessness, for instance.
  • Create a public service announcement about the importance of voting using audio, visual, or written mediums and present it to others. You can create a song using a familiar tune, make a mini-movie, or write a newspaper article or blog.
  • Select a local issue that will be voted on in an upcoming election and think of ways you can educate others about it or write a letter to your elected official about this issue. Don’t know how to write a letter to an elected official? Check out The Women’s History and Nineteenth Amendment Centennial Quarter Dollar Coin Program Act project, which gives you lots of hints about how to do it! If you want to write to your elected official about a different issue, just change those parts but keep the same format.
Promote the Vote Report Form
Fill out my online form.

 

The Promote the Vote Patch Program gives you and your troop a chance to explore this important history through simple guides and fun activities. Just want to do a quick suffrage activity? Follow the link for your grade level and get started!

Daisy  |  Brownie  |  Junior  |  Cadette  |  Senior  |  Ambassador


The Complete Suffrage Toolkit

The materials and activities in this toolkit will inspire girls to discover the history of women’s voting rights and civic engagement. Through these activities, girls will connect, have multigenerational conversations within their communities, better understand the gender barriers that have been broken, and celebrate the women who broke them.

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The Suffrage Art Projects

Check out these fun art projects that take inspiration from what early suffragists did to call attention to their cause. Get creative and put your own twist on these entertaining activities.

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The 19th Amendment Centennial Quarter Dollar Coin Project

Use your voice to speak out in support of the Women's History and Nineteenth Amendment Centennial Quarter Dollar Coin Program Act. It’s easy when you get started with this handy resource. Take action now!

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